Japanese harajuku guide

Harajuku culture

Harajuku (原宿 “meadow lodging”) is the common name for the area around Harajuku Station on the Yamanote Line in the Shibuya ward of Tokyo, Japan. It is the center of Japan’s most extreme teenage cultures and fashion styles, but also offers shopping for adults and some historic sights.
Harajuku girl

The Harajuku Girls are four young Japanese and Japanese American back up dancers featured in stage shows and music videos for Gwen Stefani during her solo pop/R&B/dance-record phase. The women also act as an entourage at Stefani’s public appearances.
This fashion infuses multiple looks and styles to create a unique form of dress. The cyber-punk look takes its influence from gothic fashion and incorporates neon and metallic colors.
Young adults in Harajuku may also be dressed as anime or manga characters (known as cosplay). Below we list the best online harajuku fashion stores and show you where to buy the very best in Japanese street fashion.

Harajuku famous Streets

Takeshita Dori
Takeshita Dori tends to be open daily from 11:00 to 20:00. The symbol of Harajuku and birthplace of many of Japan’s fashion trends, Takeshita Dori (Takeshita Street) is a narrow, roughly 400 meter Long Street lined by shops, boutiques, cafes and fast food outlets targeting Tokyo’s teenagers. Because of the street’s popularity, it becomes extremely busy and crowded on the weekends. Interesting shops and restaurants can also be found along some of the side streets.

Omotesando
Shops along Omotesando tend to be open daily from 11:00 to 20:00. Referred to as Tokyo’s Champs-Elysees, Omotesando is a one kilometer long, tree lined avenue, serving as the main approach to Meiji Shrine. Numerous stores, boutiques, cafes and restaurants, including several leading fashion brand shops, stand along the avenue. This area generally caters to an older and wealthier clientele than Takeshita Dori.